The quality of light


I’VE BEEN working through the mass of photos I took during my Greek trip and I was struck by the two below. One of them was taken in the evening  the other early the following morning. The difference in the light is very striking.

Despite all the talk about the “golden hour” just before sunset I can’t recall seeing a comparison between this light and that from other times of day that clearly shows the effect, so I thought I would share.

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The Markellos Tower, in Aegina Town, is of historical significance as it was the seat of government for Greece for several years during the War of Independence in the 1820s. Later it was used as the national treasury and as the chief of police’s HQ.

The Peloponnese and the islands of the Argo-Saronic Gulf were at the heart of the uprising against Ottoman Turk rule and the struggle was still going on at the time that Aegina effectively became the capital of free Greece, with the revolutionary leaders using the tower as an administrative centre from 1826-1829. Greece did not win international recognition as an independent nation until three years later, and it was almost another century before it achieved the form it has today.

The tower is thought to have been built by Spiros Markellos, a local independence leader in 1802, though its style suggests and earlier date and may have been constructed in the 17th Century.

Today, it seems incongruous that this little tower, in the backstreets of sleepy Aegina Town could have been at the centre of such momentous events in European history: but it is not the first time that Aegina has played a part on the world stage, legend has it that the early inhabitants were the fearsome warriors who sailed under Achilles to Troy.

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About ambientimages

Paul Cowan is a former journalist turned full-time photographer.
This entry was posted in Aegina, Golden hour, Greece, Islands, Lighting, Natural, Photography and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

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